This is from Arnie Gundersen’s website http://www.fairewinds.com/updates.

I don’t know if you’ll be able to click through from here. If not, just go to the URL above and play the video with this title.

Why Fukushima Can Happen Here:

What the NRC and Nuclear Industry Dont Want You to Know

The well-known safety flaws of Mark 1 Boiling Water Reactors have gained significant attention in the wake of the four reactor accidents at Fukushima, but a more insidious danger lurks. In this video nuclear engineers Arnie Gundersen and David Lochbaum discuss how the US regulators and regulatory process have left Americans unprotected. They walk, step-by-step, through the events of the Japanese meltdowns and consider how the knowledge gained from Fukushima applies to the nuclear industry worldwide. They discuss “points of vulnerability” in American plants, some of which have been unaddressed by the NRC for three decades. Finally, they concluded that an accident with the consequences of Fukushima could happen in the US.

With more radioactive Cesium in the Pilgrim Nuclear Plant’s spent fuel pool than was released by Fukushima, Chernobyl, and all nuclear bomb testing combined. Gundersen and Lockbaum ask why there is not a single procedure in place to deal with a crisis in the fuel pool? These and more safety questions are discussed in this forum presented by the C-10 Foundation at the Boston Public Library. Special thanks to Herb Moyer for the excellent video and Geoff Sutton for the frame-by-frame graphics of the Unit 3 explosion.

Arnie Gundersen is that rare breed — someone technically savvy but not blinded by what he knows. He is a severe critic of the nuclear industry — and he knows what he is talking about, because the came out of that industry.

Knowing what he knows, he says here, in typically low-pressure, rational style, that the time has come to put out the yellow flag, and put a moratorium on new nuclear construction. His yellow flag analogy is to car races, where there has been a pile-up. I think the yellow flag is a good analogy, but I would related in not to car wrecks, but to the flag ships used to fly to warn other ships that they were carrying the plague.

http://www.fairewinds.com/content/fairewinds-calls-nuclear-regulatory-commission-delay-licensing-until-fukushima-lessons-are-e

This mordant, trenchant commentary from cluborlov.blogspot.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 2011

Nuclear Meltdowns 101

I am no nuclear expert, and that is probably a good thing. I did do a lot of reading about Chernobyl back when it happened. And now I am, as I was then, and as I am sure many of you are, getting really fed up with incomplete, inaccurate, misleading and generally unsatisfactory explanations that are being offered for what is going on at Fukushima. Either information is not available, or it is a flood of largely irrelevant technical minutia designed to thrill nuclear nerds but bound to bamboozle rather than inform the general reader. And so, for the sake of all the other people who aren’t nuclear experts and have no ambition of ever becoming one, here’s what I have been able to piece together.

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One of the most interesting aggregator organizations is a set of websites managed by the nonprofit PEERS network (www.wanttoknow.info) Their archive of news articles: www.WantToKnow.info/indexnewsarticles. Below, five stories you didn’t see on television.

1) Lost city ‘could rewrite history’

January 19, 2002, BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/1768109.stm

The remains of what has been described as a huge lost city may force historians and archaeologists to radically reconsider their view of ancient human history. Marine scientists say archaeological remains discovered 36 metres (120 feet) underwater in the Gulf of Cambay off the western coast of India could be over 9,000 years old. The vast city – which is five miles long and two miles wide – is believed to predate the oldest known remains in the subcontinent by more than 5,000 years. Debris recovered from the site – including construction material, pottery, sections of walls, beads, sculpture and human bones and teeth has been carbon dated and found to be nearly 9,500 years old. The city is believed to be even older than the ancient Harappan civilisation, which dates back around 4,000 years. Author and film-maker Graham Hancock – who has written extensively on the uncovering of ancient civilisations [said,] “Cities on this scale are not known in the archaeological record until roughly 4,500 years ago when the first big cities begin to appear in Mesopotamia. Nothing else on the scale of the underwater cities of Cambay is known. There’s a huge chronological problem in this discovery. It means that the whole model of the origins of civilisation with which archaeologists have been working will have to be remade from scratch,” he said.

Note: Dozens of manmade complexes found under the ocean have been found, yet mainstream archeologists are largely ignoring these finds because they don’t fit the academic consensus. For an interview with former Economist reporter Grahan Hancock, who finds lots of solid, astounding evidence of a lost civilization, click here.

2) ‘Lost city’ found beneath Cuban waters

December 7, 2001, BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/1697038.stm

A team of explorers working off the western coast of Cuba say they have discovered what they think are the ruins of a submerged city built thousands of years ago. Researchers from … Canadian company [Advanced Digital Communications] used sophisticated sonar equipment to find and film stone structures more than 2,000 feet (650 metres) below the sea’s surface. The explorers first spotted the underwater city last year, when scanning equipment started to produce images of symmetrically organized stone structures reminiscent of an urban development. In July, the researchers returned to the site with an explorative robot device capable of highly advanced underwater filming work. The images the robot brought back confirmed the presence of huge, smooth blocks with the appearance of cut granite. They believe these formations could have been built more than 6,000 years ago, a date which precedes the great pyramids of Egypt by 1,500 years. “It’s a really wonderful structure which really looks like it could have been a large urban centre,” ADC explorer Paulina Zelitsky told the Reuters news agency.

Note: For an excellent discussion by former Economist reporter Grahan Hancock of this most amazing find which brings into question the accepted theories of civilization, click here.

3) Indian seabed hides ancient remains

May 22, 2001, BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/1345150.stm

Marine experts have discovered a clump of archaeological structures deep beneath the sea off India’s western coast. Although the discovery has not yet been accurately dated, the structures are said to resemble archeological sites belonging to the Harappan civilisation, dating back more than 4,000 years. This is the first time man-made structures have been found in this part of the Arabian Sea which is known as the Gulf of Cambay. The images gathered over the past six months led to a surprising discovery – a series of well-defined geometric formations were clearly seen, spread irregularly across a nine-kilometre (five-mile) stretch, a little beneath the sea bed. Some of them closely resemble an acropolis – or great bath – known to be characteristic of the Harappan civilisation. A leading marine archaologist says that far more detailed investigations need to be done to confirm the exact date of the structures.

4) Tsunami throws up India relics

February 11, 2005, BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/4257181.stm

Archaeologists say they have discovered some stone remains from the coast close to India’s famous beachfront Mahabalipuram temple in Tamil Nadu state following the 26 December tsunami. They believe that the “structures” could be the remains of an ancient and once-flourishing port city in the area housing the famous 1200-year-old rock-hewn temple. Archaeologists say they had done underwater surveys 1 km into the sea from the temple and found some undersea remains. “They could be part of the small seaport city which existed here before water engulfed them.” says T Sathiamoorthy of Archaeological Survey of India. Archaeologists say that the stone remains date back to 7th Century AD. They have elaborate engravings of the kind that are found in the Mahabalipuram temple. The temple, which is a World Heritage site, represents some of the earliest-known examples of Dravidian architecture dating back to 7th Century AD. The myths of Mahabalipuram were first set down in writing by British traveller J Goldingham … in 1798, at which time it was known to sailors as the Seven Pagodas. The myths speak of six temples submerged beneath the waves with the seventh temple still standing on the seashore. The myths also state that a large city which once stood on the site was so beautiful the gods became jealous and sent a flood that swallowed it up entirely in a single day.

5) Archaeologists probe legendary city

October 19, 2000, BBC News
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/978885.stm

Archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be the remains of a long-lost ancient Greek city, Helike. Classical texts suggest that all its inhabitants perished when the city sank beneath the waves after suffering a disastrous combination of earthquake and tidal wave. Some scholars have speculated that the catastrophe may well have been the source of Plato’s story of Atlantis, a land that supposedly suffered a similar fate. During the summer, Greek and American researchers … began digging 3m deep trenches within an area of modern orchards and vineyards of about one square mile. These revealed archaic walls, classical ceramic fragments and, perhaps most significantly, evidence that the ruins had been submerged beneath the sea. “We uncovered archaic walls buried in clay containing sea shells,” said one of the researchers, Dr Steven Soter from the American Museum of Natural History.

From NPR, via a friend.  http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=124008307

Belief In Climate Change Hinges On Worldview

by CHRISTOPHER JOYCE

February 23, 2010

Over the past few months, polls show that fewer Americans say they believe humans are making the planet dangerously warmer, despite a raft of scientific reports that say otherwise.

This puzzles many climate scientists — but not some social scientists, whose research suggests that facts may not be as important as one’s beliefs.

Take, for example, a recent debate about climate change on West Virginia public radio.

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Rather than my reposting Bill Totten’s repost of a post from the Oil Drum website, allow me to point you to his website http://billtotten.blogspot.com/

For some reason, when I click on the link above, I get an error message that says it isn’t valid. If you do too, just copy the link and paste it in the address window and hit enter. That works for me.

And, in case by the time you read he has posted other things, the post I refer to is “Systems at a Turning Point.”

This seems to me very much on point. In some ways Ronald Reagan was good for the country; in many ways, he was a disaster, because in his zeal for individual freedom he somehow lost sight of the complementary and equally necessary value of community.

We’re paying the price now, and have been in all the years since.

Outdated Maps

June 12, 2010

From Dmitri Orlov’s Club Orlov — http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/. He titled this Lost Leaders, but it might equally appropriately be titled Outdated Maps

SATURDAY, MAY 29, 2010

Lost Leaders

It is embarrassing to be lost. It is even more embarrassing for a leader to be lost. And what’s really really embarrassing to all concerned is when national and transnational corporate leaders attempt to tackle a major disaster and are found out to have been issuing marching orders based on the wrong map. Everyone then executes a routine of turning toward each other in shock, frowning while shaking their heads slowly from side to side and looking away in disgust. After that, these leaders might as well limit their public pronouncements to the traditional “Milk, milk, lemonade, round the corner fudge is made.” Whatever they say, the universal reaction becomes: “What leaders? We don’t have any.”

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